Articles tagged "Google Chrome"

Weekly post #51 - Keyboard shortcuts, charts from Forms, moderating posts in Padlet and tags and hashtag literacy

Adding a keyboard shortcut or hotkey for a Chrome Extension

I use a range of Chrome extensions to add links/articles/resources to services such as Trello, Pocket and Raindrop.

Aiming your cursor at a tiny 16-by-16 pixel Chrome extension button amidst possibly 20 others in the extension tray can feel like trying to win a carnival game with the odds firmly stacked against you.

[Source]

It is possible to assign keyboard shortcuts to Chrome extensions.

Here are the steps for adding your own personalized shortcuts for Chrome extensions.

  • In the top right corner of Google Chrome, click the 3-dot expansion menu
  • Expand the More Tools menu
  • Click Extensions
  • Click on the 'burger' in the top left hand corner of the screen and choose 'Keyboard shortcuts'
  • Scroll to the extension of interest and choose a combination of keys with either “Ctrl” or “Ctrl + Shift” and any available key

The extension developer may have added shortcut functionality for more actions within the app. 

Read more here → obie.ai - How to add and remove custom keyboard shortcuts and hotkeys for a Chrome Extension in 5 seconds flat [20 July 2020]

Heading charts from Google Form responses into Docs, Slides and Drawings

You can now embed linked response charts from Google Forms into a Google Doc, Google Slides presentation, or a Google Drawing. When new form responses are received, anyone with the proper permissions can refresh an embedded chart by simply clicking the "Update" button. This eliminates the need to re-copy the chart from the form.

Read more here → Google Workspace Updates - Embed linked Google Forms charts into Google Docs, Google Slides, and Google Drawings [1 March 2022]

Padlet - moderating posts

Padlet allows you to moderate all posts on padlet so they must be reviewed by the owner/teacher before they can be published.

Thinking about tags and hashtag literacy

Digital curation is a topic that really engages me at the minute. The effective organisation of all the things we find online that may (or may not) be useful in the future is a challenge and the tools available to help evolve.

Tags and Hashtag Literacy [14 February 2022], by Wesley Fryer, is worth a read to get you thinking about such things and how we should be integrating hashtags and tags into the research skills we teach.

Weekly post #48 – The four apps that everybody needs

I am not sure where I came across this approach first →

You should have four apps, one from each of the following areas: calendar, task manager, notes and read it later. This approach should help you be more (digitally) productive. You could use less than four as there are some really useful apps that tick more than one of the areas.

This is what I use - as well as some ideas for following the approach using Google Workspace apps.

Calendar

Google Calendar

Google Calendar is all that is needed here! I use a handful of different calendars - school, family etc - but all scheduled lessons, meetings and my daughter's football practices are here.

I use Fantastical on my iPhone and iPad to display my Google Calendar as I prefer the layout - but the Google Calendar iOS app is also very capable.

Task manager

Todoist

I'm going to say it - your email inbox should not be your 'job list'. An app where you can 'capture' and then organise all the things that you need to do can be hugely beneficial for your well-being.

There is no shortage of task manager apps available! Within the Google Workspace sphere you have Google Tasks and Google Keep. These apps also display scheduled tasks in your Google Calendar. A recent update allows you to manage overdue tasks in Google Calendar.

Personally I use todoist - and have done for a number of years now. I particularly like how the Gmail add-on allows me to quickly turn emails into tasks, the web and iOS apps and the integration with Google Calendar, Fantastical etc.

Notes

Roam Research

Notes in that nice notebook you got for your birthday, others on the back of an envelope and even some in an email you sent to yourself. One place (app) is needed where you make, organise and can quickly find your notes and thoughts.

In Google Workspace you could use a Google Doc. Utilising H1, H2 to give things structure and the document outline to quickly move around. Smart chips will also help you tie various things together.

I have tried GoodNotes on my iPad, various physical Moleskine type notebooks, Bear, Notion and Trello and more. All of them have good bits - but not the coverage that I was looking for.

I am about two weeks into using Roam Research as my note taking app of choice. It is a little geekier than some of the other options and maybe not as pretty. The speed of use and the automatic generation of connections between notes, topics, ideas is what is making it the app I keep going back to. There are 'task manager' options here too - but I am sticking with todoist for that side of things, at the minute.

Read it later

Pocket

You need somewhere to store links. That article that was shared by a colleague that you want to digest at a later date. The website you want to use next time to teach a certain topic to one of your classes. The website of that new restaurant you would like to try. All these links need to be stored and organised.

In Google Workspace you could use Chrome bookmarks and then use the Chrome Bookmark Manager to ensure links are organised into folders. Google Keep, and it's Chrome extension, can also be useful here.

I prefer a dedicated app for such things. I want an app that is 'cross platform' - I can use it on my school Chromebook, my personal iPad, my phone etc.

I use Pocket. There is a Chrome extension so that I can quickly add websites that I am viewing to Pocket - so that later on I can read them and sort them out. With tags etc you can use Pocket as an organised store of your links. I do not tend to do this. For me links get added to Pocket and then every so often I sort them out. Sites that I want to integrate into my teaching resources get added to Trello and things I want to read (in depth) are added to the iOS app Matter.

Weekly post #44 – Google Tasks, linking directly to text, Meet updates and Project Zero

New Year Resolution - Get Organised with Google Tasks

Google Tasks

The capabilities of Google Tasks are ever growing and worth a look for anybody thinking about using a digital 'to do list manager'.

There is a useful guide to Google Tasks, by Jeremy Badiner, here.

Useful tip → Link directly to text and quotes

Google Chrome

Rather than sharing a link to a whole webpage - you can now easily share a link to a certain line of text.

To create a link that opens directly to highlighted text: 

  1. On your computer, open Chrome. 
  2. Go to a page with text you want to share. 
  3. To highlight the text you want to share, click and hold, then drag your mouse.
  4. To open the context menu, right-click on the highlighted text.
  5. Select Copy link to highlight
    • If you can’t select this option, this feature may not work for the selected content.
  6. Paste the link anywhere, like an email or message thread.

Read more here.

Google Meet updates - some super interesting!

Google Meet

Live translated captions

Live translated captions are now available for our Google Workspace editions. It's not (yet) perfect but it is certainly an interesting development. Read more here.

Up to 500 participants

Users can now host meetings in Google Meet with up to 500 participants. Read more here.

New immersive backgrounds and styles for Google Meet on the web

Five new immersive backgrounds have been added for Google Meet on the web. The backgrounds feature "subtle animation that give your background life or change your lighting." Just because you can doesn't mean you should! Read more here.

Automatically move breakout room participants back to the original meeting

There is now the ability for meeting hosts and co-hosts to automatically move participants back to the main meeting room once breakout rooms end. The visual indicators have been improved for breakout room participants to indicate this movement. Read more here.

Using Jamboard with Project Zero thinking routines

If you already are using See Think Wonder, hang around. Cause Google Jamboard and STW were made for each other.

Glenn Wiebe

Super post from Glenn Wiebe at history TECH those has many applications outside of the 'history' classroom.

Weekly post #37 - Google Workspace age related changes, Todoist and managing your Chrome tabs

Google makes some age related changes

Google recently launched a new age-based access setting to make it easier for domain admins to tailor experiences for their students and educators based on age when using Google services like YouTube, Photos and Maps.

Since September 1, 2021, students who are under 18 are seeing changes in their experience across Google products.

For example, after September 1, students designated as under 18 in K-12 domains can view YouTube content assigned by teachers, but they won’t be able to post videos, comment or live stream using their school Google account.

Safer learning with Google for Education [29 June 2021]

If you used to get students to create videos and add them to YouTube you should still get students to create videos - but now they should add them to their Drive and share them with you.

Read more here → Google Workspace Admin Help - Control access to Google services by age

Are you looking for a to-do list manager?

I find that a 'proper' to-do list manager really helps me to organise what I need to do and therefore reduces the stress associated with rushing or forgetting things.

My to-do list manager of choice is Todoist. It is great on the web and has a slick smartphone app as well. It integrates nicely with Gmail so that you can easily generate tasks from emails.

If you want to know more check out this post → An Educator’s Guide to Todoist.

Chrome tab management

I have (strong) opinions on font choice and the number of tabs a 'normal' person should have open in Chrome!

If you struggle with managing all your tabs you may want to read this blog post → The Ultimate Guide to Chrome Tab Management by Jonathan Wylie. Super useful.

Basic actions on multiple tabs in Google Sheets

Now you can select multiple tabs in Google Sheets and perform basic actions on the selection (such as moving the tabs together, deleting, duplicating, copying, coloring, or hiding). I just thought some of you might like to know!

Read more here → Google Workspace Updates - Select multiple tabs in Google Sheets and perform basic actions on the selection [22 July 2021]

Weekly post #23 - Google Meet has a green room plus the waffle, hamburger, snowman and the shish kebab

Replace your background in Google Meet

It would seem that this feature appeared for us this week.

You can now replace your background with an image of your choice. To get the best results you should sit yourself quite close to a wall behind you. The plainer the wall the better the results.

Waffle, hamburger, snowman and the shish kebab

The G Suite Waffle
The G Suite Waffle

There are no official names for the various icons that access menus in Google Chrome. Therefore we should adopt our own!

The waffle - the 3 by 3 set of 9 dots, found at the top of the screen in Gmail, Drive etc that brings up the matrix of other G Suite application.

The hamburger - the three horizontal lines like the bun and patty of a hamburger, found throughout Chrome to access settings.

The snowman - the vertical line of 3 dots, like the 'buttons' upon the chest of a snowman. Usually used to view additional configuration options - such as in Google Meet.

The shish kebab - the horizontal line of 3 dots like pieces of meat on a kebab. Not as common as the 'snowman' but also gives you access to more settings and commands.

[Credit for this idea → Chromebook Classroom - Those Crazy Chromebook Icons]

Google Meet now has a 'green room'

A Practical Guide for Teaching Summarising and Note-Taking

Not strictly a digital things - but with definite overlap with research skills and approaches to learning.

If found the Delete, Substitute and Keep: A Practical Guide for Teaching Summarising and Note-Taking post from David Rodger-Goodwin super interesting.

David is certainly worth a follow.

Weekly post #13 - accepting 'knocks', Office editing mode, the Kahoot app and linking to a text fragment

Four things to check out

Accept 'knocks' in bulk

Accept 'knocks' in bulk

You can now accept all pending 'knocks' in bulk into your Google Meet. Admitting students all at once helps limit interruptions during the video call.

Read more here → Accept knocks in bulk in Google Meet

Editing Office files from your Drive

Google have changing the default editing mode for Microsoft Office files in Google Drive on the web. Now, when you double-click on an Office file, it will open directly in Office editing mode.

Read more about 'Office editing mode' here.

New study modes in the Kahoot app

Study modes in the Kahoot app for iOS and Android a brings a new, self-paced study experience to learners with four different ways to review content, get more practice with difficult topics and prepare for tests. These modes can be used with both previously played kahoots as well as new kahoots.

Read more here → Study with Kahoot!: New modes in the Kahoot! app empower learners to self-study

Linking to a text fragment

This rather useful Chrome extension allows for easily creating a special link to the currently selected text on a page via the context (right-click) menu. When opening such a special link, the browser will scroll the selected text into view and highlight it.

Install the Chrome extension from here → Link to Text Fragment

Weekly post #7 - Blurring your background and opening what you want

Three things to check out

Blur your background in Google Meet

To help limit distractions during lessons (and meetings), you can now blur the background of your video in Google Meet. When it’s turned on, Meet will intelligently separate you from the background, blurring your surroundings while keeping you clear and in focus.

I feel that some of our students will really appreciate the feature, should we return to remote-learning, to keep a bit more of their home private.

The ability to filter out disruptive background noise in Google Meet should also be arriving soon.

Read more here → Blur your background in Google Meet

Google Chrome - On start-up...

All faculty at Campus des Nations should be logged in and syncing with Google Chrome. There are all sorts of advantages including the ability for the school to install (on your behalf) extensions.

We recently removed the controls the school has over the 'On start-up' options. This allows you to decide which webpages open when you launch Chrome.

Here are some suggested pages →

Read more about setting your homepage and startup page here → support.google.com

Google Meet help sheet

Written to reflect most of the most recent updates to Google Meet and focusing on educator use.

Weekly post #4 - ManageBac notifications and Google Meet participants

The wonderful world of educational technologies continues to spin during our summer holidays. There have been a number of developments related to platforms that we use. Several companies have also released roadmaps of future changes.

A request...

Please sign into Chrome with your school Google Account. This not only allows your bookmarks etc to be synchronised etc but it allows us (IT) to support you more easily.

A useful read from Google here → Get more out of Google Meet with these tips.


Four things to check out

ManageBac Mobile Push Notifications

We are excited to introduce advanced Push Notifications for both the ManageBac Android and iOS mobile apps. All important messages and notifications can now be sent directly to your mobile device via the Push Notifications.

Read more here → ManageBac Mobile Push Notifications

Anonymous users are now blocked from Google Meet for G Suite for Education meetings by default

Google Meet

Anonymous users (users not signed into a Google account) can no longer join meetings organized by anyone with a G Suite for Education or G Suite Enterprise for Education license

Read more here → Anonymous users will be blocked from Google Meet for G Suite for Education meetings by default

Block Google Meet participants from knocking again

Google Meet

If a meeting moderator rejects a knock twice from the same participant, the participant will be blocked from knocking again. This means the moderator won’t see any additional knocks from that user for the duration of the existing meeting.

Read more here → Block Google Meet participants from knocking again

The Google Meet Grid View Extension has broken

Google Meet

The Chrome extension we have been using to give the grid view in Google Meet is a 'hack'. It's not an official release from Google but is it from a respected source. Google have changed some of the magic sauce they use and therefore the extension no longer works. If you are signed into Chrome with your school Google account the next time to turn off-on your laptop in school the broken extension should be removed. I recommend that you remove the broken extension if it doesn't happen automatically. Google have announced a 7 by 7 (49 participants) grid view in Google Meet from September (but they didn't say from when in September).


Coming soon…

A useful (and possibly exciting read) from Google here → More details on what's coming to Meet and Classroom.

Filter out disruptive noise in Google Meet

To help limit interruptions to your meeting, Google Meet can now intelligently filter out background noise like keyboard typing, doors opening and closing, and construction outside your window.

Read more here → Filter out disruptive noise in Google Meet

An integrated workspace in G Suite to help you make the most of your time

A new integrated workspace experience that brings Chat, Meet, and Gmail together on desktop and mobile

Read more here → Coming soon: An integrated workspace in G Suite to help you make the most of your time

Finding your Chrome extensions, deleting one and adding another

There are a few ways to find which extensions you have installed on Google Chrome:

  • Type chrome://extensions into the omnibar (the search/URL bar at the top of Chrome) and press enter.

or

  • Click on the three dots in the top right hand corner of Chrome, then More Tools, then Extensions.

The Extension page lists all the extensions you have installed. Now is a good time for a 'clean up' - anything that you do not recognize should be removed by clicking 'Remove'.

To add an extension explore the Chrome Web Store to find what you are looking for. Once you have found one - being careful of the source and purpose etc - such as this one: Google Meet Grid View - click on 'Add to Chrome' and then 'Add extension' in the pop-up box.

Weekly post #1 - Google Chrome and Chrome Extensions

The idea is a weekly post - aimed at the needs of the educators at International School of Geneva - Campus des Nations - linked to from the 'Week at a Glance'. Each post will highlight four things of interest with some kind of increasing complexity or involvement.

Signing into your Chrome profile

Being signed into Chrome (and not just into your Google account) allows you to choose to sync password, histories, settings etc. Being signed into your @ecolint.ch account allows the school to 'push' various useful Chrome extensions to you. The school currently 'pushes' Google Docs Offline, Google Meet Grid View, Nod, Office Editing for Docs, Sheets & Slides and Screencastify to staff.

All students should be signed into Chrome using their @learning.ecolint.ch accounts as we also 'push' extensions to them.

Managing Chrome extensions

Another video from the talented Richard Byrne from Free Technology for Teachers. His site and social media feeds are well worth following for educational technology ideas, reviews and support.

This short clip explains how to find and manage the extensions you have installed in Chrome.

Nod - Reactions for Google Meet

Nod has been 'pushed' out to all staff and students in Secondary.

Nod allows the members of a Meet to react with a limited set of 'reactions'. One of the most useful is the ability to 'raise your hand'.

You need to be logged into Chrome with your @ecolint.ch (or students with their @learning.ecolint.ch account) for the extension to appear.

In order to see or send reactions, each user will need to have the extension installed.

Dualless - Chrome extension

Dualless is a useful Chrome extension if you do not have the luxury of a two monitor setup. It helps split your screen so you can see the Meet and what you may be presenting. The video above shows how it can be used to make your life a little easier when presenting during a Meet.