Weekly post #38 – Family focused – a podcast, a toolkit and some apps

This is the 38th ‘weekly post’ that I have added to digitaltechnologies.education. The 37 other posts where primarily aimed at educators. From now on I am going to try and add a monthly post focused upon digital citizenship considerations that both educators and families may find engaging.

Is it possible to make the internet safe for children?

An interesting listen from the UK based ‘The Guardian’ newspaper. The nature of the risks parents have to think about, the effectiveness of the approaches which can be used to reduce them, and the possible limitations of any such systems are all discussed in a sensible and balanced manner.

If you would like to discuss any of the issues raised by the podcast – please do not hesitate to contact me at school.

Childnet International Parent and Carers Toolkit

Childnet International is a non-profit organisation “working with others to help make the internet a great and safe place for children”.

The Childnet International Parent and Carers Toolkit provides resources that offer practical tips and advice upon:

  • Starting discussions about their online life
  • Setting boundaries around online behaviour and technology use
  • Finding out where to get more help and support

Does your child have a Nintendo Switch?

Does your child have a Nintendo Switch?

The UK Safer Internet Centre has a useful post about the available parental controls on the Switch.

Parental controls are useful tools as part of a larger discussion between parents and children about gaming console use, screen time and the appropriateness of certain game titles.

Helping your child to ‘get things done’

Todoist

Students have lots of things to juggle – and it only gets more complicated as they get older.

Google Workspace, that all the students at the International School of Geneva – Campus des Nations have access to, has two in-built digital task manager options – Google Tasks and Google Keep.

For those students looking for something a little more evolved I would highly recommend Todoist.

The effective use of a digital task manager takes practice and support. Todoist recently released A Student’s Guide to Todoist which is an interesting read for all older students (and their parents) who are looking for a tool to help them get things done in a deliberate and organised way.